KISSY (Kyoto Intercultural Summer School for Youths)

What is KISSY?


Goal of KISSY


Youths will experience how to create new things breaking barriers of language, culture, and religion. Accomplishment of successful collaborations will furthermore generate youths' motivation communicate with others who come from different countries. In KISSY activity, youths will use Pangaea original machine translation tool so that they can express their opinion by using their own language in any language groups. Motivation of communication is triggered by speaking up and listening to others. KISSY experience will provide youths with an opportunity to feel the need to learn other languages.

NPO Pangaea mission is to create a platform for youths to be able to feel a bond across borders. KISSY is one of such innovative challenges in which youths polish their sense of global community in selected members from Kenya, Korea, Cambodia and Japan.

Result of KISSY2016


Children from Kenya, Korea, Cambodia, Austria and Japan gathered in Kyoto for KISSY (Kyoto Intercultural Summer School for Youths) on the 30st July ~ 6th Aug. 2016. KISSY is set up and run by NPO Pangaea and is an international youths summer shool for workshop with IT, transcending the difference of languages and cultures.

During KISSY, 35 children aged from 9 to 15 stayed together at the Youth Hostel in Kyoto and got to know each other by spending time together also in their free time. There is this one simple rule to follow, 'Don't do things that make others unhappy.' Without any common languages, children continued disucussion to create a work on the theme of‘bonding’by using state-of-the-art translation tool. Sometimes they struggled faced with the difference and misunderstanding in their opinion. And sometimes they jumped with joy when they connected each other. Finally they made a great success in collabration work with the unique and original programming. Recognized its pioneer spirit, KISSY has been supported by Japanese National Commission for UNESCO, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan and the board of Education in Kyoto. On the last day, KISSY activity was broadcasted on NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation) and be reported in some newspapers.


Voices
Kenyan participant

Each of us was assigned a computer which enabled us to communicate since the computers could translate all our languages. This gave me the desire to study in Japan.

Due to our creativity the national television station of Japan interviewed us. I said, I was so glad to represent Africa in such an occasion. We later went to show our presentation to a multitude and expressed our idea.

I made 22 friends including the staff members. I loved the place so much in that we were all treated equally with no discrimination, all the people were appreciate and always had respect for each other. Truly I love Japan with passion.

Japanese participant

I was so happy to communicate with children from abroad. I felt we are all “the same people” except we speak a different languages. I was glad to have such an opportunity.

I found out that the difference of languages doesn't matter as long as we can understand each other.

Japanese participant

I was so excited to see so many equipments like motors and speakers!

We developed many ideas of picking up each country’s music, putting a traditional costume on the dolls. While working, we could chat with PC, but I managed with gesturing. When I could make myself understood, I felt "Yes, I did it!"

Cambodian participant

I'm very happy when I met people from other countries, and I'm glad to learn and know them. I knew some experience from KISSY project. The second day they shared us a small laptop. We played a game together and knew how to log in a program.

We improved our work and plan every day. In this time every group must invent a house and design by our teams and make it like cartoon and it must be a happy house. I like this program very much and we can know a lot from there. We hope next year we can go back to Japan again and meet different things from Pangaea.

KISSY2017


Agenda of KISSY2017 (interim)


2nd August (Wed.)

14:00

Gathering at Kyoto Station.

15:00

Checking-in at a hotel

Introduction of KISSY2017 agenda

3rd August (Thu.)

09:00-17:30

KISSY2017 Opening Clocktower, Kyoto University

Program introduction

4th August (Fri.)

Whole day

Workshop

5th August (Sat.)

Whole day

Workshop

6th August (Sun.)

09:00-12:00,13:00-18:00

Presentation / Group discussion

7th August (Mon.)

09:00-15:00,15:00-18:00

Group field trip / Meeting

8th August (Tue.)

09:00-17:00,18:00-21:00

Field trip

9th August (Wed.)

10:00

End (Parted at Kyoto Station)

Organized and sponsored by: NPO Pangaea

Co-organized and co-sponsored by: Ishida & Matsubara Lab., Department of Social Infomatics, Kyoto University

Corporation by: Korea MIZY Center, National Museums of Kenya, Japan Relief for Cambodia, Bright Future Kids Home

Foundation(Last year): KDDI foundation, The Japan World Exposition 1970 Commemorative Fund, Global G.L.O.W

Under the auspices of (Last year): Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan / Japanese National Commission for UNESCO / Board of Education in Kyoto city

Participation


Date: From 2nd to 9th Aug. 2017

Age: From 8 years old to 14 years old

Fee: 150,000JPY (including tax)

Early registration fee: 130,000JPY (including tax)
It covers everything except transportation from/to youth's home to/from JR Kyoto Station.

Main Venue: Kyoto University Clock Tower Centennial Hall


If you are interested in participation to KISSY2017, please contact to Administration Office of NPO Pangaea via email:

info [at] pangaean.org

If you are interested in participation to KISSY2017, please download KISSY2017 Application Form (PDF file) below. In order to apply, please read the instruction carefully, fill out the form, and mail it to Pangaea. The application will be closed as soon as the number of participants reaches the limit. You will be noticed how to pay the participation fee after the participation is comfirmed.


Download the KISSY2017 Application Form (PDF file) here.